Large commercial building completely of the municipal water grid

Growthpoint has successfully taken a sizable South African commercial building completely off of the municipal water grid. 

Woodstock’s The District has become the group’s first ‘water net-positive’ building and the first of several commercial properties in Cape Town that Growthpoint intends to take off-grid.

The multi-tenant office and retail building has seven floors and five basement levels with 18 721 square meters of lettable area that accommodated a charismatic community of twenty-five businesses, used by approximately 1 750 people on a daily basis whom consume around 45 000 litres of water per day.

By taking The District and other commercial buildings off the water grid, and substituting municipal water with a safe and sustainable alternative source of drinking water, we are taking pressure off the city’s potable water reserves, adding to the resilience of the city’s water system, and contributing positively to the environment” commented Timothy Irvine, Growthpoint Properties’ regional asset manager for the Western Cape.

A naturally occurring underground mountain spring flows to the building’s basement with crystal-clear water being pumped from the basement sump to prevent flooding. The water was pumped straight into the city’s storm-water system where it flows into the sea less than one kilometer away.

Before the drought hit the city, Growthpoint investigated the possibility of using this sump water as grey water for flushing the building’s toilets. However, its design (which has evolved over the years) prevented this.

It is incredibly frustrating to have a sustainable alternative water source that has to be flushed down the drain because it is not safe to drink. So, we challenged ourselves to find a way to use the sump to provide drinking water that is completely safe for human consumption for the entire building,” explains Irvine.

This was no simple task. Growthpoint had to identify and adapt an existing technology never before used for this type of water filtration. It also had to work with the City of Cape Town to get special legislation drafted and passed to allow it to produce water on a large scale. In addition, it had to get buy-in from the building’s tenants.

Fortunately, the process was made easier by the positive response from major stakeholders, including The City of Cape Town and tenants of The District, specifically major tenant Ogilvy Cape Town.

Vicki Buys, Managing Director of Ogilvy Cape Town adds, “Thank you to the Growthpoint team for their efforts in making this self-sufficiency happen. In spite of these measures and the rain, the city’s crisis remains real and will only be resolved if we all keep usage at a low level permanently.”

Now, Growthpoint provides all the water for this bustling building from the basement, where its filtration plant can be found in its own sterile glass-fronted room. This enables anyone to view the sump water being made into drinking water. The plant’s filtration plant installation has also been designed to create a greater understanding and awareness about water. It is even labelled so that viewers can follow the process and learn how it works.

Some 140,000 litres of water flow naturally through the sump each day, and the filtration plant has been designed to clean the entire flow.

The legislation that the City of Cape Town drafted to enable Growthpoint to produce water on a large scale came into effect in November 2017, when Growthpoint was given the go-ahead to become a Water Services Intermediary. It can, however, only supply water to those with which it has a contractual obligation – its tenants. It does this at exactly the same rate as the municipality.

With this legislation in place, other commercial property owners are also enabled to do the same.

Net-zero water initiatives are an important part of Growthpoint’s journey as it strives to make all its new developments net-zero by 2030,” points out Irvine. “This is an exciting leap forward on our journey, which is for the betterment of everyone.”

And, The District is the first of a number of buildings that Growthpoint intends to take off the municipal water grid. The next building it is aiming to take off-grid is 200 on Main. All the buildings identified are in Cape Town, as this is the only city with the legislation in place to enable it.

Growthpoint would certainly consider doing the same with suitable buildings in other cities and is happy to work with them to achieve this,” says Irvine.

Growthpoint is already ensuring that all the new buildings it develops across South Africa have the potential to go off the water grid to future-proof its property assets.

A look into the filtration process Growthpoint developed for The District:

The filtration process begins when water from the sump is placed in holding tanks. It then goes through a bag-filter which filters our bigger debris, such as leaves and stones, to protect the filters before passing through ultra-filtration canisters which filters it to 0.02 microns, or one-thousandth of the diameter of a human hair. This cleans the water, but to remove any viruses the water then passes into a charcoal filtration canister to absorb bacteria and any smells. After this, it flows to a holding tank where it is dosed with ozone, which clumps together anything that may still be left in the water before pushing it through reverse osmosis, which strips everything out of the water. This process is effective to 0.0007 microns, and is the same process used to remove salt from seawater. After this thorough filtration process, the water is re-mineralised with calcium. Unlike municipal water, no chlorine is added. Finally, water is then fed to the building’s water system, via holding tanks.

To ensure the water is safe to drink, the filtration plant is equipped with a system that measures conductivity. While water itself doesn’t conduct electricity, the impurities in water do. The filtration system immediately shuts down if there is a change in the conductivity levels of the filtered water.

 

Monthly average nominal house prices in South Africa from 1966 to 2013

Month	        Price	        Growth (month on month)
31-Dec-2013	R 1,208,950	0.67%
30-Nov-2013	R 1,200,847	0.73%
31-Oct-2013	R 1,192,174	0.76%
30-Sep-2013	R 1,183,127	0.76%
31-Aug-2013	R 1,174,238	0.61%
31-Jul-2013	R 1,167,106	0.47%
30-Jun-2013	R 1,161,672	0.45%
31-May-2013	R 1,156,432	0.54%
30-Apr-2013	R 1,150,224	0.65%
31-Mar-2013	R 1,142,823	0.75%
28-Feb-2013	R 1,134,351	0.86%
31-Jan-2013	R 1,124,659	0.90%
31-Dec-2012	R 1,114,646	0.90%
30-Nov-2012	R 1,104,705	0.89%
31-Oct-2012	R 1,094,957	0.88%
30-Sep-2012	R 1,085,440	0.95%
31-Aug-2012	R 1,075,267	1.11%
31-Jul-2012	R 1,063,418	1.25%
30-Jun-2012	R 1,050,298	1.18%
31-May-2012	R 1,038,024	0.91%
30-Apr-2012	R 1,028,705	0.48%
31-Mar-2012	R 1,023,746	-0.07%
29-Feb-2012	R 1,024,499	-0.56%
31-Jan-2012	R 1,030,292	-0.88%
31-Dec-2011	R 1,039,466	-1.00%
30-Nov-2011	R 1,049,933	-0.86%
31-Oct-2011	R 1,058,997	-0.58%
30-Sep-2011	R 1,065,202	-0.28%
31-Aug-2011	R 1,068,232	0.00%
31-Jul-2011	R 1,068,251	0.27%
30-Jun-2011	R 1,065,335	0.46%
31-May-2011	R 1,060,425	0.61%
30-Apr-2011	R 1,054,003	0.59%
31-Mar-2011	R 1,047,806	0.53%
28-Feb-2011	R 1,042,288	0.46%
31-Jan-2011	R 1,037,516	0.47%
31-Dec-2010	R 1,032,642	0.55%
30-Nov-2010	R 1,026,993	0.50%
31-Oct-2010	R 1,021,901	0.23%
30-Sep-2010	R 1,019,575	-0.24%
31-Aug-2010	R 1,022,027	-0.81%
31-Jul-2010	R 1,030,338	-1.15%
30-Jun-2010	R 1,042,328	-1.04%
31-May-2010	R 1,053,251	-0.50%
30-Apr-2010	R 1,058,576	0.30%
31-Mar-2010	R 1,055,459	1.07%
28-Feb-2010	R 1,044,268	1.42%
31-Jan-2010	R 1,029,635	1.36%
31-Dec-2009	R 1,015,813	1.08%
30-Nov-2009	R 1,005,006	0.89%
31-Oct-2009	R 996,150	1.05%
30-Sep-2009	R 985,798	1.36%
31-Aug-2009	R 972,532	1.63%
31-Jul-2009	R 956,919	1.55%
30-Jun-2009	R 942,350	0.94%
31-May-2009	R 933,572	0.11%
30-Apr-2009	R 932,564	-0.54%
31-Mar-2009	R 937,645	-0.90%
28-Feb-2009	R 946,183	-0.82%
31-Jan-2009	R 953,985	-0.50%
31-Dec-2008	R 958,771	-0.26%
30-Nov-2008	R 961,301	-0.20%
31-Oct-2008	R 963,273	-0.27%
30-Sep-2008	R 965,840	-0.33%
31-Aug-2008	R 969,072	-0.34%
31-Jul-2008	R 972,414	-0.28%
30-Jun-2008	R 975,128	-0.03%
31-May-2008	R 975,457	0.18%
30-Apr-2008	R 973,723	0.25%
31-Mar-2008	R 971,290	0.31%
29-Feb-2008	R 968,332	0.33%
31-Jan-2008	R 965,108	0.30%
31-Dec-2007	R 962,241	0.34%
30-Nov-2007	R 958,943	0.42%
31-Oct-2007	R 954,946	0.42%
30-Sep-2007	R 950,923	0.47%
31-Aug-2007	R 946,521	0.64%
31-Jul-2007	R 940,544	0.83%
30-Jun-2007	R 932,845	0.95%
31-May-2007	R 924,031	1.07%
30-Apr-2007	R 914,279	1.18%
31-Mar-2007	R 903,595	1.27%
28-Feb-2007	R 892,239	1.36%
31-Jan-2007	R 880,256	1.48%
31-Dec-2006	R 867,458	1.51%
30-Nov-2006	R 854,576	1.45%
31-Oct-2006	R 842,399	1.30%
30-Sep-2006	R 831,570	1.12%
31-Aug-2006	R 822,370	0.96%
31-Jul-2006	R 814,580	0.92%
30-Jun-2006	R 807,179	1.02%
31-May-2006	R 799,044	1.13%
30-Apr-2006	R 790,096	1.20%
31-Mar-2006	R 780,736	1.19%
28-Feb-2006	R 771,556	1.16%
31-Jan-2006	R 762,745	1.13%
31-Dec-2005	R 754,186	1.16%
30-Nov-2005	R 745,516	1.22%
31-Oct-2005	R 736,566	1.26%
30-Sep-2005	R 727,394	1.30%
31-Aug-2005	R 718,061	1.30%
31-Jul-2005	R 708,815	1.33%
30-Jun-2005	R 699,529	1.35%
31-May-2005	R 690,216	1.35%
30-Apr-2005	R 681,012	1.35%
31-Mar-2005	R 671,916	1.33%
28-Feb-2005	R 663,075	1.36%
31-Jan-2005	R 654,164	1.44%
31-Dec-2004	R 644,906	1.59%
30-Nov-2004	R 634,816	1.83%
31-Oct-2004	R 623,388	2.12%
30-Sep-2004	R 610,442	2.36%
31-Aug-2004	R 596,375	2.50%
31-Jul-2004	R 581,851	2.56%
30-Jun-2004	R 567,326	2.56%
31-May-2004	R 553,174	2.56%
30-Apr-2004	R 539,366	2.61%
31-Mar-2004	R 525,621	2.74%
29-Feb-2004	R 511,623	2.83%
31-Jan-2004	R 497,543	2.87%
31-Dec-2003	R 483,651	2.77%
30-Nov-2003	R 470,630	2.45%
31-Oct-2003	R 459,355	2.08%
30-Sep-2003	R 449,994	1.75%
31-Aug-2003	R 442,269	1.57%
31-Jul-2003	R 435,439	1.53%
30-Jun-2003	R 428,895	1.60%
31-May-2003	R 422,147	1.75%
30-Apr-2003	R 414,900	1.86%
31-Mar-2003	R 407,343	1.86%
28-Feb-2003	R 399,891	1.73%
31-Jan-2003	R 393,107	1.55%
31-Dec-2002	R 387,092	1.39%
30-Nov-2002	R 381,784	1.35%
31-Oct-2002	R 376,691	1.40%
30-Sep-2002	R 371,497	1.52%
31-Aug-2002	R 365,943	1.66%
31-Jul-2002	R 359,979	1.69%
30-Jun-2002	R 353,984	1.66%
31-May-2002	R 348,216	1.44%
30-Apr-2002	R 343,278	1.14%
31-Mar-2002	R 339,395	0.92%
28-Feb-2002	R 336,309	0.87%
31-Jan-2002	R 333,418	0.87%
31-Dec-2001	R 330,538	0.95%
30-Nov-2001	R 327,424	1.12%
31-Oct-2001	R 323,786	1.22%
30-Sep-2001	R 319,875	1.32%
31-Aug-2001	R 315,709	1.33%
31-Jul-2001	R 311,564	1.32%
30-Jun-2001	R 307,508	1.21%
31-May-2001	R 303,833	1.06%
30-Apr-2001	R 300,649	0.90%
31-Mar-2001	R 297,962	0.75%
28-Feb-2001	R 295,731	0.71%
31-Jan-2001	R 293,643	0.85%
31-Dec-2000	R 291,182	1.08%
30-Nov-2000	R 288,068	1.30%
31-Oct-2000	R 284,384	1.49%
30-Sep-2000	R 280,203	1.51%
31-Aug-2000	R 276,027	1.31%
31-Jul-2000	R 272,445	1.04%
30-Jun-2000	R 269,644	0.85%
31-May-2000	R 267,381	0.99%
30-Apr-2000	R 264,756	1.39%
31-Mar-2000	R 261,123	1.87%
29-Feb-2000	R 256,338	2.21%
31-Jan-2000	R 250,803	2.33%
31-Dec-1999	R 245,091	2.10%
30-Nov-1999	R 240,043	1.60%
31-Oct-1999	R 236,269	0.95%
30-Sep-1999	R 234,047	0.44%
31-Aug-1999	R 233,033	0.24%
31-Jul-1999	R 232,482	0.36%
30-Jun-1999	R 231,637	0.65%
31-May-1999	R 230,144	0.86%
30-Apr-1999	R 228,179	0.89%
31-Mar-1999	R 226,173	0.71%
28-Feb-1999	R 224,570	0.32%
31-Jan-1999	R 223,860	-0.21%
31-Dec-1998	R 224,328	-0.52%
30-Nov-1998	R 225,495	-0.44%
31-Oct-1998	R 226,495	-0.03%
30-Sep-1998	R 226,555	0.46%
31-Aug-1998	R 225,508	0.86%
31-Jul-1998	R 223,584	1.03%
30-Jun-1998	R 221,315	0.95%
31-May-1998	R 219,236	0.74%
30-Apr-1998	R 217,627	0.57%
31-Mar-1998	R 216,383	0.55%
28-Feb-1998	R 215,193	0.71%
31-Jan-1998	R 213,685	1.01%
31-Dec-1997	R 211,542	1.40%
30-Nov-1997	R 208,629	1.65%
31-Oct-1997	R 205,244	1.78%
30-Sep-1997	R 201,655	1.85%
31-Aug-1997	R 197,988	1.83%
31-Jul-1997	R 194,431	1.71%
30-Jun-1997	R 191,171	1.58%
31-May-1997	R 188,204	1.32%
30-Apr-1997	R 185,761	0.97%
31-Mar-1997	R 183,972	0.67%
28-Feb-1997	R 182,752	0.48%
31-Jan-1997	R 181,873	0.36%
31-Dec-1996	R 181,229	0.31%
30-Nov-1996	R 180,672	0.31%
31-Oct-1996	R 180,119	0.35%
30-Sep-1996	R 179,486	0.32%
31-Aug-1996	R 178,906	0.26%
31-Jul-1996	R 178,449	0.16%
30-Jun-1996	R 178,164	0.10%
31-May-1996	R 177,977	0.22%
30-Apr-1996	R 177,596	0.30%
31-Mar-1996	R 177,062	0.35%
29-Feb-1996	R 176,451	0.42%
31-Jan-1996	R 175,715	0.51%
31-Dec-1995	R 174,831	0.48%
30-Nov-1995	R 174,002	0.35%
31-Oct-1995	R 173,399	0.17%
30-Sep-1995	R 173,111	0.00%
31-Aug-1995	R 173,108	-0.01%
31-Jul-1995	R 173,121	0.09%
30-Jun-1995	R 172,961	0.24%
31-May-1995	R 172,546	0.40%
30-Apr-1995	R 171,852	0.62%
31-Mar-1995	R 170,794	0.79%
28-Feb-1995	R 169,460	0.79%
31-Jan-1995	R 168,132	0.75%
31-Dec-1994	R 166,889	0.64%
30-Nov-1994	R 165,835	0.54%
31-Oct-1994	R 164,945	0.48%
30-Sep-1994	R 164,158	0.55%
31-Aug-1994	R 163,261	0.71%
31-Jul-1994	R 162,109	0.96%
30-Jun-1994	R 160,564	1.18%
31-May-1994	R 158,698	1.30%
30-Apr-1994	R 156,669	1.34%
31-Mar-1994	R 154,602	1.28%
28-Feb-1994	R 152,656	1.12%
31-Jan-1994	R 150,969	0.87%
31-Dec-1993	R 149,673	0.67%
30-Nov-1993	R 148,679	0.60%
31-Oct-1993	R 147,798	0.59%
30-Sep-1993	R 146,925	0.71%
31-Aug-1993	R 145,891	0.81%
31-Jul-1993	R 144,723	0.84%
30-Jun-1993	R 143,521	0.72%
31-May-1993	R 142,502	0.45%
30-Apr-1993	R 141,864	0.19%
31-Mar-1993	R 141,598	0.07%
28-Feb-1993	R 141,502	0.19%
31-Jan-1993	R 141,236	0.50%
31-Dec-1992	R 140,528	0.86%
30-Nov-1992	R 139,323	1.05%
31-Oct-1992	R 137,869	1.03%
30-Sep-1992	R 136,469	0.69%
31-Aug-1992	R 135,540	0.12%
31-Jul-1992	R 135,377	-0.40%
30-Jun-1992	R 135,918	-0.69%
31-May-1992	R 136,863	-0.75%
30-Apr-1992	R 137,901	-0.68%
31-Mar-1992	R 138,846	-0.47%
29-Feb-1992	R 139,508	-0.18%
31-Jan-1992	R 139,758	0.14%
31-Dec-1991	R 139,566	0.48%
30-Nov-1991	R 138,898	0.77%
31-Oct-1991	R 137,841	0.98%
30-Sep-1991	R 136,504	1.13%
31-Aug-1991	R 134,974	1.26%
31-Jul-1991	R 133,298	1.31%
30-Jun-1991	R 131,578	1.33%
31-May-1991	R 129,857	1.40%
30-Apr-1991	R 128,066	1.44%
31-Mar-1991	R 126,253	1.39%
28-Feb-1991	R 124,525	1.22%
31-Jan-1991	R 123,020	1.01%
31-Dec-1990	R 121,792	0.80%
30-Nov-1990	R 120,828	0.71%
31-Oct-1990	R 119,980	0.67%
30-Sep-1990	R 119,187	0.59%
31-Aug-1990	R 118,486	0.59%
31-Jul-1990	R 117,795	0.71%
30-Jun-1990	R 116,963	0.97%
31-May-1990	R 115,835	1.30%
30-Apr-1990	R 114,352	1.58%
31-Mar-1990	R 112,575	1.71%
28-Feb-1990	R 110,678	1.68%
31-Jan-1990	R 108,850	1.50%
31-Dec-1989	R 107,246	1.12%
30-Nov-1989	R 106,054	0.77%
31-Oct-1989	R 105,246	0.61%
30-Sep-1989	R 104,608	0.69%
31-Aug-1989	R 103,890	0.93%
31-Jul-1989	R 102,933	1.23%
30-Jun-1989	R 101,687	1.49%
31-May-1989	R 100,194	1.63%
30-Apr-1989	R 98,588	1.62%
31-Mar-1989	R 97,020	1.46%
28-Feb-1989	R 95,626	1.17%
31-Jan-1989	R 94,523	0.90%
31-Dec-1988	R 93,679	0.85%
30-Nov-1988	R 92,888	0.94%
31-Oct-1988	R 92,020	1.10%
30-Sep-1988	R 91,017	1.34%
31-Aug-1988	R 89,814	1.47%
31-Jul-1988	R 88,511	1.32%
30-Jun-1988	R 87,359	1.00%
31-May-1988	R 86,495	0.68%
30-Apr-1988	R 85,909	0.56%
31-Mar-1988	R 85,435	0.67%
29-Feb-1988	R 84,863	0.97%
31-Jan-1988	R 84,045	1.31%
31-Dec-1987	R 82,958	1.53%
30-Nov-1987	R 81,705	1.62%
31-Oct-1987	R 80,406	1.55%
30-Sep-1987	R 79,182	1.35%
31-Aug-1987	R 78,129	1.20%
31-Jul-1987	R 77,205	1.16%
30-Jun-1987	R 76,322	1.21%
31-May-1987	R 75,409	1.30%
30-Apr-1987	R 74,440	1.42%
31-Mar-1987	R 73,394	1.49%
28-Feb-1987	R 72,313	1.46%
31-Jan-1987	R 71,272	1.25%
31-Dec-1986	R 70,392	0.88%
30-Nov-1986	R 69,777	0.46%
31-Oct-1986	R 69,460	0.15%
30-Sep-1986	R 69,354	-0.04%
31-Aug-1986	R 69,381	-0.18%
31-Jul-1986	R 69,505	-0.22%
30-Jun-1986	R 69,658	-0.29%
31-May-1986	R 69,858	-0.47%
30-Apr-1986	R 70,187	-0.65%
31-Mar-1986	R 70,649	-0.70%
28-Feb-1986	R 71,149	-0.58%
31-Jan-1986	R 71,566	-0.37%
31-Dec-1985	R 71,830	-0.13%
30-Nov-1985	R 71,925	0.02%
31-Oct-1985	R 71,914	-0.05%
30-Sep-1985	R 71,950	-0.23%
31-Aug-1985	R 72,119	-0.39%
31-Jul-1985	R 72,403	-0.54%
30-Jun-1985	R 72,794	-0.59%
31-May-1985	R 73,228	-0.55%
30-Apr-1985	R 73,632	-0.57%
31-Mar-1985	R 74,055	-0.71%
28-Feb-1985	R 74,584	-0.87%
31-Jan-1985	R 75,236	-0.98%
31-Dec-1984	R 75,980	-1.07%
30-Nov-1984	R 76,802	-1.10%
31-Oct-1984	R 77,654	-1.01%
30-Sep-1984	R 78,442	-0.82%
31-Aug-1984	R 79,087	-0.61%
31-Jul-1984	R 79,570	-0.41%
30-Jun-1984	R 79,901	-0.27%
31-May-1984	R 80,120	-0.18%
30-Apr-1984	R 80,267	-0.10%
31-Mar-1984	R 80,348	0.04%
29-Feb-1984	R 80,314	0.28%
31-Jan-1984	R 80,091	0.70%
31-Dec-1983	R 79,533	1.27%
30-Nov-1983	R 78,538	1.77%
31-Oct-1983	R 77,170	2.00%
30-Sep-1983	R 75,657	1.94%
31-Aug-1983	R 74,216	1.71%
31-Jul-1983	R 72,969	1.53%
30-Jun-1983	R 71,871	1.55%
31-May-1983	R 70,776	1.74%
30-Apr-1983	R 69,562	2.08%
31-Mar-1983	R 68,148	2.36%
28-Feb-1983	R 66,578	2.35%
31-Jan-1983	R 65,050	2.03%
31-Dec-1982	R 63,757	1.54%
30-Nov-1982	R 62,789	1.09%
31-Oct-1982	R 62,114	0.79%
30-Sep-1982	R 61,626	0.78%
31-Aug-1982	R 61,149	0.89%
31-Jul-1982	R 60,611	0.96%
30-Jun-1982	R 60,032	0.96%
31-May-1982	R 59,464	0.97%
30-Apr-1982	R 58,893	1.03%
31-Mar-1982	R 58,294	1.07%
28-Feb-1982	R 57,679	1.22%
31-Jan-1982	R 56,983	1.36%
31-Dec-1981	R 56,216	1.52%
30-Nov-1981	R 55,376	1.73%
31-Oct-1981	R 54,432	1.98%
30-Sep-1981	R 53,378	2.15%
31-Aug-1981	R 52,253	2.36%
31-Jul-1981	R 51,050	2.61%
30-Jun-1981	R 49,751	2.75%
31-May-1981	R 48,420	2.80%
30-Apr-1981	R 47,101	2.80%
31-Mar-1981	R 45,819	2.81%
28-Feb-1981	R 44,568	2.80%
31-Jan-1981	R 43,353	2.77%
31-Dec-1980	R 42,184	2.80%
30-Nov-1980	R 41,033	2.81%
31-Oct-1980	R 39,910	3.02%
30-Sep-1980	R 38,739	3.21%
31-Aug-1980	R 37,533	3.26%
31-Jul-1980	R 36,348	3.16%
30-Jun-1980	R 35,233	2.94%
31-May-1980	R 34,228	2.56%
30-Apr-1980	R 33,375	2.10%
31-Mar-1980	R 32,687	1.70%
29-Feb-1980	R 32,141	1.43%
31-Jan-1980	R 31,688	1.23%
31-Dec-1979	R 31,302	1.10%
30-Nov-1979	R 30,962	1.11%
31-Oct-1979	R 30,621	1.26%
30-Sep-1979	R 30,241	1.35%
31-Aug-1979	R 29,839	1.47%
31-Jul-1979	R 29,406	1.48%
30-Jun-1979	R 28,977	1.44%
31-May-1979	R 28,566	1.21%
30-Apr-1979	R 28,224	0.97%
31-Mar-1979	R 27,954	0.79%
28-Feb-1979	R 27,735	0.71%
31-Jan-1979	R 27,539	0.81%
31-Dec-1978	R 27,317	0.92%
30-Nov-1978	R 27,067	0.96%
31-Oct-1978	R 26,808	1.05%
30-Sep-1978	R 26,530	1.20%
31-Aug-1978	R 26,217	1.16%
31-Jul-1978	R 25,917	0.79%
30-Jun-1978	R 25,715	0.28%
31-May-1978	R 25,643	0.05%
30-Apr-1978	R 25,629	-0.04%
31-Mar-1978	R 25,640	-0.06%
28-Feb-1978	R 25,655	0.10%
31-Jan-1978	R 25,629	0.46%
31-Dec-1977	R 25,511	0.78%
30-Nov-1977	R 25,314	0.79%
31-Oct-1977	R 25,116	0.33%
30-Sep-1977	R 25,034	-0.21%
31-Aug-1977	R 25,087	-0.42%
31-Jul-1977	R 25,193	-0.09%
30-Jun-1977	R 25,215	0.37%
31-May-1977	R 25,123	0.60%
30-Apr-1977	R 24,974	0.56%
31-Mar-1977	R 24,834	0.54%
28-Feb-1977	R 24,701	0.36%
31-Jan-1977	R 24,612	0.08%
31-Dec-1976	R 24,591	-0.22%
30-Nov-1976	R 24,646	-0.21%
31-Oct-1976	R 24,698	-0.19%
30-Sep-1976	R 24,746	-0.14%
31-Aug-1976	R 24,781	-0.14%
31-Jul-1976	R 24,817	-0.11%
30-Jun-1976	R 24,845	0.25%
31-May-1976	R 24,782	0.69%
30-Apr-1976	R 24,612	0.90%
31-Mar-1976	R 24,393	0.80%
29-Feb-1976	R 24,200	0.68%
31-Jan-1976	R 24,037	0.58%
31-Dec-1975	R 23,899	0.63%
30-Nov-1975	R 23,749	0.72%
31-Oct-1975	R 23,580	0.84%
30-Sep-1975	R 23,383	0.85%
31-Aug-1975	R 23,186	0.47%
31-Jul-1975	R 23,077	0.02%
30-Jun-1975	R 23,072	-0.31%
31-May-1975	R 23,145	-0.16%
30-Apr-1975	R 23,181	0.57%
31-Mar-1975	R 23,048	1.43%
28-Feb-1975	R 22,724	2.04%
31-Jan-1975	R 22,270	2.19%
31-Dec-1974	R 21,792	1.83%
30-Nov-1974	R 21,401	0.79%
31-Oct-1974	R 21,234	-0.17%
30-Sep-1974	R 21,271	-0.62%
31-Aug-1974	R 21,404	-0.37%
31-Jul-1974	R 21,484	0.17%
30-Jun-1974	R 21,448	0.62%
31-May-1974	R 21,316	0.92%
30-Apr-1974	R 21,122	0.85%
31-Mar-1974	R 20,944	0.45%
28-Feb-1974	R 20,850	-0.09%
31-Jan-1974	R 20,870	-0.40%
31-Dec-1973	R 20,953	-0.24%
30-Nov-1973	R 21,005	0.54%
31-Oct-1973	R 20,892	1.54%
30-Sep-1973	R 20,574	2.19%
31-Aug-1973	R 20,132	2.41%
31-Jul-1973	R 19,658	2.11%
30-Jun-1973	R 19,251	1.58%
31-May-1973	R 18,951	0.93%
30-Apr-1973	R 18,777	0.67%
31-Mar-1973	R 18,651	0.80%
28-Feb-1973	R 18,502	1.05%
31-Jan-1973	R 18,309	1.37%
31-Dec-1972	R 18,061	1.50%
30-Nov-1972	R 17,794	1.51%
31-Oct-1972	R 17,530	1.37%
30-Sep-1972	R 17,293	1.36%
31-Aug-1972	R 17,062	1.32%
31-Jul-1972	R 16,839	1.04%
30-Jun-1972	R 16,666	0.50%
31-May-1972	R 16,584	-0.03%
30-Apr-1972	R 16,588	-0.35%
31-Mar-1972	R 16,646	-0.23%
29-Feb-1972	R 16,685	0.20%
31-Jan-1972	R 16,653	0.35%
31-Dec-1971	R 16,595	0.46%
30-Nov-1971	R 16,519	0.63%
31-Oct-1971	R 16,415	0.49%
30-Sep-1971	R 16,336	0.24%
31-Aug-1971	R 16,296	0.12%
31-Jul-1971	R 16,277	0.37%
30-Jun-1971	R 16,216	0.84%
31-May-1971	R 16,081	1.11%
30-Apr-1971	R 15,906	1.00%
31-Mar-1971	R 15,748	0.49%
28-Feb-1971	R 15,671	0.04%
31-Jan-1971	R 15,665	0.11%
31-Dec-1970	R 15,647	0.27%
30-Nov-1970	R 15,605	0.34%
31-Oct-1970	R 15,552	0.52%
30-Sep-1970	R 15,472	0.58%
31-Aug-1970	R 15,383	0.54%
31-Jul-1970	R 15,301	0.69%
30-Jun-1970	R 15,195	0.95%
31-May-1970	R 15,053	1.36%
30-Apr-1970	R 14,851	1.76%
31-Mar-1970	R 14,594	1.96%
28-Feb-1970	R 14,314	1.89%
31-Jan-1970	R 14,048	1.46%
31-Dec-1969	R 13,846	1.17%
30-Nov-1969	R 13,687	0.92%
31-Oct-1969	R 13,562	0.89%
30-Sep-1969	R 13,443	0.84%
31-Aug-1969	R 13,331	0.75%
31-Jul-1969	R 13,231	0.73%
30-Jun-1969	R 13,135	0.96%
31-May-1969	R 13,011	1.07%
30-Apr-1969	R 12,873	1.00%
31-Mar-1969	R 12,746	0.88%
28-Feb-1969	R 12,635	0.54%
31-Jan-1969	R 12,567	0.40%
31-Dec-1968	R 12,516	0.44%
30-Nov-1968	R 12,461	0.80%
31-Oct-1968	R 12,362	1.22%
30-Sep-1968	R 12,213	1.64%
31-Aug-1968	R 12,016	2.01%
31-Jul-1968	R 11,779	1.78%
30-Jun-1968	R 11,573	1.30%
31-May-1968	R 11,424	0.90%
30-Apr-1968	R 11,323	0.27%
31-Mar-1968	R 11,292	-0.31%
29-Feb-1968	R 11,328	-0.67%
31-Jan-1968	R 11,404	-0.92%
31-Dec-1967	R 11,509	-0.77%
30-Nov-1967	R 11,598	-0.41%
31-Oct-1967	R 11,647	-0.05%
30-Sep-1967	R 11,652	0.59%
31-Aug-1967	R 11,583	1.02%
31-Jul-1967	R 11,466	1.16%
30-Jun-1967	R 11,335	0.87%
31-May-1967	R 11,236	0.65%
30-Apr-1967	R 11,163	1.10%
31-Mar-1967	R 11,042	1.95%
28-Feb-1967	R 10,831	3.06%
31-Jan-1967	R 10,509	3.99%
31-Dec-1966	R 10,106	3.81%
30-Nov-1966	R 9,735	        2.70%
31-Oct-1966	R 9,480	        1.30%
30-Sep-1966	R 9,358	        -0.41%
31-Aug-1966	R 9,397	        -1.33%
31-Jul-1966	R 9,523	        -0.98%
30-Jun-1966	R 9,617	        0.00%
31-May-1966	R 9,617	        0.84%
30-Apr-1966	R 9,538	        1.24%
31-Mar-1966	R 9,421	        1.38%
28-Feb-1966	R 9,292	        1.95%
31-Jan-1966	R 9,114

Average nominal house prices in South Africa from 1966 to 2013

Year	Price	        Growth (YoY)
2013	R 1,166,384	9.92%
2012	R 1,061,166	0.60%
2011	R 1,054,788	1.77%
2010	R 1,036,416	7.41%
2009	R 964,876	-0.35%
2008	R 968,309	4.11%
2007	R 930,114	14.54%
2006	R 812,026	15.31%
2005	R 704,204	22.71%
2004	R 573,869	32.24%
2003	R 433,968	21.18%
2002	R 358,132	15.27%
2001	R 310,685	14.28%
2000	R 271,863	17.12%
1999	R 232,127	4.90%
1998	R 221,284	13.81%
1997	R 194,435	8.94%
1996	R 178,486	3.60%
1995	R 172,276	7.60%
1994	R 160,113	10.68%
1993	R 144,659	4.96%
1992	R 137,825	4.39%
1991	R 132,032	13.39%
1990	R 116,443	14.76%
1989	R 101,468	14.65%
1988	R 88,503	15.10%
1987	R 76,895	9.73%
1986	R 70,078	-3.97%
1985	R 72,973	-7.69%
1984	R 79,048	9.02%
1983	R 72,506	20.28%
1982	R 60,283	20.22%
1981	R 50,143	38.30%
1980	R 36,258	23.83%
1979	R 29,281	11.98%
1978	R 26,147	4.34%
1977	R 25,060	1.89%
1976	R 24,596	6.05%
1975	R 23,193	9.08%
1974	R 21,261	8.27%
1973	R 19,638	15.29%
1972	R 17,034	5.51%
1971	R 16,144	7.02%
1970	R 15,085	14.52%
1969	R 13,172	11.56%
1968	R 11,808	4.51%
1967	R 11,298	18.72%
1966	R 9,516

The Home Loan process in South Africa

And you thought traffic is stressful. Buying a home and registering a bond can be even more stressful and can take about as long as it takes to find the proverbial needle in a haystack.

These are usually the role players

– Seller

– Buyer

– Estate Agent (if applicable)

– Transferring Attorney (appointed by the seller)

– Bond Attorney (appointed by the bank)

– Cancelling Attorney (appointed by the bank cancelling the sellers bond)

If possible, try and use the same attorney to speed things up.

Seller and Buyer sign an offer to purchase

The buyer contacts either their bank or more recommended a bond originator. The bond originators negotiate excellent rates and, in most instances, get a better rate than your own bank.

The Approval

The bank approves the home loan and instructs the bond attorney to register a mortgage bond

The Property Transfer

The seller instructs the transferring attorney to transfer the property

The title deed and cancellation figures are requested from the bank that holds the bond over the property

A statement of rates and taxes is requested from the local authority (stick around, this can take ages)

The Transferring Attorney

The transferring attorney receives the title deed and cancellation figures, and sends a copy

The transferring attorney asks the buyer and seller to sign the transfer documents

The buyer pays the transfer costs (ouch)

The Cancellation Attorney

The cancellation attorney is requested to cancel the seller’s bond on receipt of a guarantee for the amount owing

The Bond Attorney

Bond attorney contacts transferring attorney (and chat about the old varsity days)

The bond attorney advises the transferring attorney of the amount available for guarantees, and requests the draft deed of transfer and the guarantee requirements

The bond attorney prepares the bond documentation together with the buyer

The buyer signs the documents and pays the costs

The bond attorney prepares and issues the necessary guarantees, forwards them to the transferring attorney, and prepares the mortgage bond documents for lodging at the Deeds Office

The Deeds Office

All the documents are lodged simultaneously at the Deeds Office by arrangement with all the attorneys concerned

The Deeds Office takes about two to three weeks to check the documents before they are ready for registration by all the attorneys on the same day.

The Bank

On the day of registration, the bank pays out in accordance with the guarantees issued

Allow at least three months for the registration and transfer of the mortgage bond

What could delay the registration of a mortgage bond?

Failure by the seller to provide details of the bank holding the existing bond

Delay in receiving rates figures from the local authority and/or clearance certificates

Delay in the provision of guarantees

Failure by the buyer to pay transfer and/or bond costs on time

The seller delays the signing of transfer documents

The buyer delays the signing the transfer and/or bond documents

Failure by the seller and/or buyer to provide personal information

The existing bond holder not providing cancellation figures and title deeds to the transferring attorney

Failure by the buyer to pay a deposit (if required)

The buyer delays obtaining employee income documents for new bondholders, and a failure to comply with other bank requirements

How Do You Start Your Own Body Corporate

A body corporate is the governing body that helps you manage a unit block or a group of townhouses. Basically a group of people that share common areas like driveways or gardens or elevators or pools all those different kind of things.

You are going to need someone managing the body corporate. Now that someone can be yourself or it can be a professional company that does it for you. However it’s not legally required that you have a professional company do it.

So you can do it yourself I’ve done some research on this to find out how you can do it yourself and to take some of the steps. I won’t go into the full technical details of everything that needs to be done but I can give you an overview of what you need to do.

As mentioned before you can do it yourself but you do need to be aware that you will be taking on some responsibility and liability if things go wrong or if you’re not keeping up with legislation or your insurance lapse, so there will be some personal liability if you decide to run this yourself. It can also be a lot of work, there is a steep learning curve and things you need to know about running your own body corporate so there’s going to be a lot of time needed to be put in to understand how to do it and in the running of it there’s going to be time and management there as well.

The first thing that you’re going to need is chairman. This is the person that is running the show. You’re going to need a treasurer, which is someone that is going to manage the finances. The chairman and the treasurer can be the same person you’re also going to need a secretary this is person that is going to minute the meetings that you have whether you have them on an annual basis or whether you have them more frequently.

If you do decide to do it yourself, you’re going to need to understand the basics. So you’re going to need to understand exactly what is common property, what is common property on the property that you are managing, what insurances do you need and you also need to get valuations done on a regular basis to ensure these insurances are kept up to date. You also need to know how to comply with fire regulations; you need to know about the legal requirements for safety audits for the property etc;

You also need to know how to manage the body corporate accounts, the bank accounts and all of the finances. One of the common requirements not legal requirements but just it’s a good idea you have a lot of owner occupiers in your block. If you have a large percentage of people who own and occupy in the block vs people who own it but rent it out so people who are investors then it seems to go better. This is because people who live there, probably take more pride in the common areas and the unit block itself, whereas people who are just renting don’t really see that stuff as their responsibility. They are renting, they do what they need to do but really it’s the responsibility of the owner to make that happen.

So when you are managing it yourself if owners are just investors and they don’t really care about it and they’re not going to do a lot to help you with the upkeep, well then you’re going to be running it basically by yourself and so that’s going to be pretty difficult for you and pretty time consuming so it might be worth paying the fee. So now let’s have a look at some of the things that will draw your time and take your attention. This means that you are going to need to follow up with the other owners if they don’t pay their fees on time and ensure that they pay their fees on time. If they don’t then you’re going to have to deal with that confrontation and those legal issues.

You need to ensure that insurance is current and sufficient for the property and that may mean getting a valuer in each and every year to ensure that your insurance is kept up to date. You need to arrange for an AGM which is an annual general meeting each and every year ensuring every owner gets sufficient notice and you need to ensure that the correct minutes are taken.

You need to have time to arrange maintenance to occur on the property when its required and you need to make sure that someone’s on site when needed for the trades people to come through. Maybe trades people can come through and you don’t need to be on site in some circumstances but there will be areas where they are going to need access to locked areas and so someone’s going to have to be on site that’s probably going to have to be you or you need to work that out with one of the other owners.

You need to be the one to deal with disputes so when disputes happen, when its confrontation, when people don’t agree and let’s face it when owners get together they’re not friends . There could be massive disagreements, so that’s something you’re going to need to be prepared for that you’re going to have to deal with that.

You’re also going to need to have time and know how to deal with managing agents and managing tenants. If tenants are doing the wrong thing, you’re going to be the one to deal with that and to make sure they don’t do the wrong thing and that they actually follow the rules. So there is a lot to learn, there’s a lot that is going to take up your time, it can be done in terms of the legalities behind it and in terms of the forms you need to fill out and all that sort of stuff.